A Question of Romance

I said yesterday that I’d watched, and loved, the Breakfast at Tiffany’s movie. I did. And then I read the novella. And while I enjoyed it a huge amount (it is a classic for good reason) I couldn’t help but question the blurb on the cover, hailing it as ‘The most romantic story ever written’. Now, of course, that could just be my tastes and it may well be true. I just can’t help thinking there are other worthy contenders out there for such an illustrious title.

My question is, dear readers: what do YOU think the most romantic story ever written is?

If I love (see what I did there!) any of your recommendations, I’ll send you chocolates or a rose or something.

13 Comments on “A Question of Romance

  1.  by  Quillers

    I think the film of Breakfast at Tiffany’s is wonderfully romantic, Nik. But the novella is a different kettle of fish altogether. For a start, the narrator is very clearly gay (and Truman Capote).

    I have two contenders for most romantic. Jane Eyre and Rebecca, yet both are very dark in their way. The heroines really have to work hard to be happy, and I think that’s what makes a really good romance. When the love has to be earned (on both sides).

    •  by  nikperring

      Do you know I’ve never read Rebecca! Must change that soon!
      And yes, the novella is really quite different to the film, isn’t it? Holly’s not quite so sweet, which I like in a way.
      Interesting you say that love should be earned – as someone who doesn’t really have much to do with the genre of romance, it’s quite new to me; I think that, in the love stories I’ve liked, romance isn’t the main aim – it’s just something that happens alongside other things. Interesting stuff!

      •  by  Mandy

        It was made into a film starring Susan Sarandon, which was pretty good but the book is far better. Essentially it’s about the relationship between a young, rich, successful, attractive Jewish guy and an older, less attractive (Susan Sarandon didn’t fit the character description of the book!) burger joint waitress. He is a widower – his perfect Jewish princess wife was killed in a car accident a year or two before the story begins. I’m saying no more in case you decide to read it, but the film makes the end section look all too easy, whereas in the book it is more complex, and therefore more satisfying. Great romance…

  2.  by  daisy

    I definitely could not agree more on the Jane Eyre, Rebecca front, I think Emma would be an excellent contender too, in a less passionate and obvious way. But I can’t help but feel there’s a greater love story out there. I love the original Beauty and the Beast by J.M LePrince de Beaumont, it’s wonderful, about enduring love. In fact, lots of classic fairytales have the best portrayals of love–you’d know that Nik; you’ve probably read more fairytales than I have!

    •  by  nikperring

      Oh yes. Of course, fairytales. And probably strangely accurate too, as they don’t tend to end all that well 🙂

  3.  by  claireking9

    I truly lived the love story in The Time Traveller’s Wife. The love is so enduring and heartbreaking and messy, trying to hold together a marriage in the strangest of situations. On the one hand fantastical but on the other very close to the everyday truth.

  4.  by  Joe Melia

    The love story between Pam and Jim at the heart of the American Office TV series is wonderful – full of wit, agony, pain, exhilaration and a rare convincing beauty.

  5.  by  angela readman

    I love Jane Eyre, but the wife in the attic thing takes the romance out of it for me. Most of the stories with love in them I like don’t end well,struggling to think of what’s romantic. Then it came to me, probably the most romantic thing I ever heard wasn’t fiction. Duke of Windsor giving up the throne in order to marry Wallis Simpson was remarkable. I’m not into the royals so much, but its pretty romantic, to give up something like that to be with the woman you love.

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